Living in Rio de Janeiro

Living in Rio de Janeiro

From the streets during February’s Carnival to afternoons on Copacabana Beach, life in this Brazilian city is infused with the sounds of samba and the search for the good life.

Rio de Janeiro is almost impossibly marvellous, with its curving white beaches and city neighbourhoods studded with green-shrouded mountains, all facing the blue depths of the Atlantic Ocean. The city is being transformed, as a booming economy and decreasing crime rates attract those who like to work and play hard. From the city streets during February’s Carnival to afternoons on Copacabana Beach, life here is infused with the sounds of samba and the search for the good life.

What is it known for?

The girl from Ipanema is still walking and the views from Sugarloaf Mountain on the city’s Guanabara Bay are as sweet as ever, but its Rio’s future that is the buzz right now. The city, like the rest of Brazil, is booming, not only due to the recent discovery of off-shore oil fields, but also because two huge global events are coming to Rio over the next few years. The city will host the 2014 World Cup finals and the 2016 Summer Olympics, and Rio is experiencing massive construction projects, including the rehabbing of neighbourhoods, transport and sporting venues.

The famous Maracana football stadium, one of the largest in the world, is undergoing a total renovation expected to be completed in 2013 before it hosts the World Cup kick off in June 2014 and the Olympic opening ceremony in August 2016. The Metro is being expanded and new areas of the city are being constructed. For example, the Porto Maravilha, an eight billion reais project due to be completed by 2016, is stitching the revitalised Guanabara Bay harbourfront to the downtown district. The project will see the demolition of an elevated highway, the planting of 15,000 trees and construction of the Museum of Tomorrow, designed by Santiago Calatrava and set to open in 2014.
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Brasil: Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro

Brasil: Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro

Copacabana is a bairro (neighbourhood) located in the South Zone of the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It is known for its 4 km balneario beach or 2.5 miles , which is one of the most famous in the world.

The district was originally called Sacopenapã (translated from the Tupi language, it means “the way of the socós (a kind of bird)”) until the mid-18th century. It was renamed after the construction of a chapel holding a replica of the Virgen de Copacabana, the patron saint of Bolivia.

Characteristics

Copacabana begins at Princesa Isabel Avenue and ends at Posto Seis (lifeguard watchtower Six). Beyond Copacabana, there are two small beaches: one, inside Fort Copacabana and the other, right after it: Diabo (“Devil”) Beach. Arpoador beach, where surfers go after its perfect waves, comes next, followed by the famous borough of Ipanema. The area will be one of the four “Olympic Zones” during the 2016 Summer Olympics. According to Riotur, the Tourism Secretariat of Rio de Janeiro, there are 63 hotels and 10 hostels in Copacabana.

Brasil: Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro

Copacabana Beach

Copacabana beach, located at the Atlantic shore, stretches from Posto Dois (lifeguard watchtower Two) to Posto Seis (lifeguard watchtower Six). Leme is at Posto Um (lifeguard watchtower One). There are historic forts at both ends of Copacabana beach; Fort Copacabana, built in 1914, is at the south end by Posto Seis and Fort Duque de Caxias, built in 1779, at the north end. One curiosity is that the lifeguard watchtower of Posto Seis never existed.[4] Hotels, restaurants, bars, night clubs and residential buildings dot the promenade facing Avenida Atlantica.

Copacabana Beach plays host to millions of revellers during the annual New Year’s Eve celebrations and, in most years, has been the official venue of the FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup.