Yerebatan Basilica Cistern in Istanbul

Yerebatan Basilica Cistern in Istanbul

The Basilica Cistern is the largest of several hundred ancient cisterns that lie beneath the city of Istanbul (formerly Constantinople), Turkey. The cistern, located 500 feet (150 m) southwest of the Hagia Sophia on the historical peninsula of Sarayburnu, was built in the 6th century during the reign of Byzantine Emperor Justinian I.

The name of this subterranean structure derives from a large public square on the First Hill of Constantinople, the Stoa Basilica, beneath which it was originally constructed. Before being converted to a cistern, a great Basilica stood in its place, built between the 3rd and 4th centuries during the Early Roman Age as a commercial, legal and artistic centre. The basilica was reconstructed by Illus after a fire in 476.

Ancient texts indicated that the basilica contained gardens, surrounded by a colonnade and facing the Hagia Sophia. According to ancient historians, Emperor Constantine built a structure that was later rebuilt and enlarged by Emperor Justinian after the Nika riots of 532, which devastated the city.

Historical texts claim that 7,000 slaves were involved in the construction of the cistern. The enlarged cistern provided a water filtration system for the Great Palace of Constantinople and other buildings on the First Hill, and continued to provide water to the Topkapi Palace after the Ottoman conquest in 1453 and into modern times.

Yerebatan Basilica Cistern in Istanbul

Yerebatan Basilica Cisdern In Media

The cistern was used as a location for the 1963 James Bond film From Russia with Love. In the film, it is referred to as being constructed by the Emperor Constantine, with no reference to Justinian, and is located under the Soviet consulate. Its real-life location is a considerable distance from the former Soviet (now Russian) consulate, which is in Beyoğlu, the “newer” European section of Istanbul, on the other side of the Golden Horn.

In 1969 the cistern was used as a setting in Pawn in Frankincense, the fourth of the Lymond Chronicles books by Dorothy Dunnett.

The finale of the 2009 film The International takes place in a fantasy amalgam of the Old City, depicting the Basilica Cistern as lying beneath the Sultan Ahmed Mosque, which, in the film, is directly adjacent to the Süleymaniye Mosque.

The cistern is featured in Clive and Dirk Cussler’s 2010 Dirk Pitt fiction novel, Crescent Dawn and The Navigator.

In the 2011 video game, Assassin’s Creed: Revelations, the player controlled character, Ezio Auditore, is given the chance to explore a section of this cistern in a memory sequence entitled The Yerebatan Cistern.

The cistern is also featured in Jean-Baptiste Andrea’s film thriller Brotherhood of Tears (2013). In the sequence, the lead character, acting as a transporter (played by Jeremie Renier), delivers a suitcase to a mysterious client (played by Turkish actor Ali Pinar).

The cistern with its inverted Medusa pillar was used prominently in the climax of the new Dan Brown novel Inferno featuring Robert Langdon, where the antagonist planned to make his attack.

In the young adult Marvel novel Black Widow: Forever Red by Margaret Stohl, published in October 2015, the climactic scenes take place in the cistern and in a secret lab hidden behind it.

The Mosaics of St. Sophia Museum at Istanbul

The Mosaics of St. Sophia Museum at Istanbul

The Narthex

The Narthex of St. Sophia is divided into vine bays with quadripartite vaults. Each bay gives access to the interior of the Museum, which thus may be entered through the great central portal and through the four lesser openings to the North and four to the South of it.

Above the marble facing of the walls extends a frieze of opus sectile (height, 0·47 m.) which is separated from the mosaic lunettes and vaults by a vine moulding of stucco. The length of a unit of the mould is 0·87 m. The frieze had by the nineteenth century fallen into a state of such dilapidation that the Fossati covered it with a copy of its design in paint, but it is possible to regain certain lengths of it intact.

The Mosaics

THE mosaics throughout the Narthex largely owe their preservation to the skilful work of Gaspare and Giuseppe Fossati, who between the years 1847 and 1849 were engaged at the command of the Sultan Abdulmecid in the task of renovating the Mosque and preserving the mosaics. Under their supervision the mosaics of the Narthex which cover the panels of the vaulted ceiling, the soffits of the arches, the lunettes over the doors leading into the Museum, the crenellated borders which trace the ribs, and the acanthus scrolls which frame the windows, were all re-established. Where disintegration was evident, plaster was introduced to fill the holes left by fallen tessellae and spread to grip those still in place, and sometimes even metal wing cramps and nails, regrettably of iron, were employed hastily, in order to effect local strengthening.

The golden ground of the mosaics of the ceiling and the geometric patterns and floriated designs which cover it and its component members were by this method consolidated and conserved without restoration. Missing parts of designs were frankly copied in paint and lee to view, but no restorations, in the sense of stripping off old mosaics and resetting them, or of introducing new ones, were attempted.

When these architects came to treat the mosaics in the lunettes and soffits A to I, in addition to the work of examination and reinforcement, they submitted the Byzantine representation in the central Lunette E, over the Royal Entrance, as well as the mosaic crosses in the eight other lunettes and in the soffits, to a covering of paint or of gold leaf, and by this means they partly concealed the work of the Byzantine artists.

The painters employed to draw the veil merely chose for the theme of their cumin Byzantine patterns from the mosaics of the vaulting of the Narthex close above their heads and copied them. The execution of this operation was of a very perfunctory character in stencil. No original design was introduced by them into the Narthex; and when during 1932 the surfaces were freed from the extraneous oil-painting, no Turkish work, and no ancient work, and no work of any merit whatever was destroyed. Sketches made by Major Cornelius Loos as late as 1710 show that the crosses were freely exposed at that time. It would thus seem that no screening of the Byzantine decoration in the Narthex had occurred up to the eighteenth century; nor are there traces of any earlier covering than that of the Fossati.

The mosaic work as fortified by the Fossati, both that in the areas beneath their painting and the large open tracts of gold background, was found generally to be well preserved. Investigation proved that the original composition of lime and powdered marble which was used to embed the Justinian mosaics varied throughout the Narthex. New batches of the mixture had been constantly made, and sometimes, perhaps, in careless haste. The blend used in Lunette D may have been faulty in its proportions; it yielded, at least, a weaker bed, which consequently showed some degeneration.

The gold ground was not covered as were the crosses. The paint covering the crosses varied in depth and strength. It was more solid and hence more difficult to remove in some lunettes than in the others. Nowhere, as in the Great Mosque at Damascus, was there a covering of plaster which could be cut off in strips. Neverthdess, in the work of removing from the mosaics the disfigurement of the paint it has not been found necessary to use solvents of any kind; the cleaning of the original mosaics has been accomplished by simple and innocuous mechanical means. The thin paint covering me mosaics is particularly amenable to flaking and was carefully removed tessella by tessella by means of a small steel chisel, such as has been used in delicately cleaning fossils and in scraping oil varnish and over painting from pictures. The liberation has been confined to the erasure of the paint; it was considered wiser not to disturb the plaster introduced by the Fossati into the interstices between the cubes, for it strengthens the decorations without defacing them seriously.

Still, surprisingly little of the original mosaic in the Narthex has been lost in the course of centuries.

The Frieze of Opus Sectile

The frieze of opus sectile constitutes a ribbon border formed of three longitudinal bands. These bands, of which the central one is wider than the upper and lower mutually similar ones, are edged by four plain, marble creases. The upper and lower creases are yellow and rosy in colour; the two creases framing middle band of the frieze are white.

The designs on the three bands of the frieze are of unequal force. The effect of the central band predominates over that of the upper and lower ancillary zones, each of which repeats a simple theme. This consists of a restrained, undulating figure produced by a series of loosely flowing M’s, presented alternately uptight and reversed.

Holiday in Turkey – The Land of Turks

Holiday in Turkey - The Land of Turks

The Turkish land has so much to see or do, from appreciating the historical richness and heritage to enjoying the water sports, winter sports, from shopping across the Istanbul markets to enjoying the opera, from hiking and climbing to walking the green trails, Turkey has something for everyone.

Situated between the continents of Europe and Asia, Turkey seems to have the best of both with it. Turkey is a developing country that also borders with the Middle East. Deciding to Holiday in Turkey is a perfect thought, especially, if you are interested in knowing its ancient and historical background as well as its archeological treasure. The first ruler of this land of Turks was Kemal Ataturk.

Things to do in Turkey

When visiting the Turkish land for a holiday in turkey, there are numerous things you can do to make your holiday a memorable one. These are:

– You can enjoy the adventure loaded activities like water sports in the Mediterranean and Aegian resorts, such as windsurfing, diving, water rafting sailing and water skiing.

– You can do mountain climbing, rock climbing on the famous mountain ranges like the Kackar Mountains (in Black Sea region) and Mount Ararat (in eastern Turkey).

Holiday in Turkey - The Land of Turks

– You can go shopping in Istanbul grand bazaar as well as along the streets of up market Nisantasi and Istiklal Caddesi (Pera). The Istanbul Grand Bazaar (Kapalicarsi) is known as world’s largest and biggest covered market.

– You can also go skiing and trekking in Turkey as part of your Turkish holiday. The Lycian Way stretches to 500 km and is between Fethiye and the Antalya, offering a great trekking region along with amazing greenery to add to the trekking experience. You can also go skiing in various resorts such as south of Bursa, Palandoken, Erciyes and many more.

– Play golf, with various golf courses available accross the resorts and the main golfing area being in the Belek Mediterranean resort.

– Do not forget to relish the Turkish bath in your Turkish holiday; these are famous as ‘Hamam’. The best of hamams are situated in the Istanbul, such as Cagaloglu Hamam (Sultanahmet) and Galatasaray Hamam (Beyoglu).

– If you are visiting in the months of June and July for your holiday in turkey, do not miss the Ballet festival and Aspendos International Opera.

Things to see in Turkey

Some of the top most Turkish attractions not to be missed when holidaying in turkey are Goreme Open-Air Museum, Ancient City of Ephesus, Kaymakli, Turkish Hamams, Blue Mosque (Sultan Ahmet Camii), Swan Bar, Topkapi Palace, Kapadokya Balloons, Yerebatan Sarayi (Underground Cistern), Sultanahmet District, historic town of Safranbolu, Ishak Pasa Palace, Lake Van, Mediterranean city of Antalya, Bodrum, Bosphorus suburbs, Sumala Monastery (54 kms from Trabzon) and more.

Visit Turkey in winter if you wish to enjoy your Turkish holiday with winter sports. But if you wish to holiday in turkey while enjoying the sun, sand and beaches, make sure its summer when you holiday in the land of Turks.

The Mosaics of St. Sophia in Istanbul

The Mosaics of St. Sophia in Istanbul

Europe nd Asia meet in Turkey with the Bosphorus as the dividing line. On her borders are Greece, Bulgaria, Armenia, Georgia, Iran, Iraq and Syria. It is a country on which 12 different civilizations have left their mark and is rich in antiquities.

It has the ruins of the Greeks, Romans, the Assyrians, Persians, Hittites and Mongols. The Narthex of St. Sophia is divided into vine bays with quadripartite vaults.

Each bay gives access to the interior of the Mosque, which thus may be entered through the great central portal and through the four lesser openings to the North and four to the South of it. Above the marble facing of the walls extends a frieze of opus sectile (height, 0·47 m.) which is separated from the mosaic lunettes and vaults by a vine moulding of stucco. The length of a unit of the mould is 0·87 m. The frieze had by the nineteenth century fallen into a state of such dilapidation that the Fossati covered it with a copy of its design in paint, but it is possible to regain certain lengths of it intact.

The Mosaics of St. Sophia in Istanbul

The frieze of opus sectile constitutes a ribbon border formed of three longitudinal bands. These bands, of which the central one is wider than the upper and lower mutually similar ones, are edged by four plain, marble creases. The upper and lower creases are yellow and rosy in colour; the two creases framing middle band of the frieze are white.

The designs on the three bands of the frieze are of unequal force. The effect of the central band predominates over that of the upper and lower ancillary zones, each of which repeats a simple theme. This consists of a restrained, undulating figure produced by a series of loosely flowing M’s, presented alternately uptight and reversed.

General Information About Turkey

General Information About Turkey

Area: 779,452 sq km
Population: 78.1 million
Capital City: Ankara
People: Turks (85%), Kurds (12%), 3% other Islamic peoples, Armenians, Jews
Language: Turkish, Arabic, Armenian, Greek, Kurdish
Religion: Muslim
Time Zone: GMT+2
Dialling Code: 90
Weights & measures: Metric
Member of EU: No

The Republic of Turkey (Türkiye Cumhuriyeti) is located in South Eastern Europe (the area west of the Bosporus) and South Western Asia. Turkey is bordered by the Aegean Sea, the Mediterranean Sea, Greece, Bulgaria, the Black Sea, Azerbaijan, Iran, Georgia, Armenia, Iraq and Syria.

Ankara is the capital and second largest city of Turkey. Istanbul is largest city, finance capital and largest port. Other major cities include İzmir, Bursa, Adana, Gaziantep, Kocaeli (İzmit), Denizli, Kayseri, Mersin (İçel), Trabzon, Antalya, Samsun, Konya, Erzurum, Tekirdağ, Edirne.

Turkey can be divided into seven geographical regions: Marmara (Marmara) Region, Black Sea (Karadeniz) Region, Central Anatolia (Orta Anadolu) Region, the Mediterranean (Akdeniz) Region, Aegean (Ege) Region, Eastern Anatolia (Doğu Anadolu) Region and the South Eastern Anatolia (Güneydoğu Anadolu) Region.

The terrain is mountainous with a central plateau and a narrow coastal plain. Turkey has many rivers including the Fırat, Kızılırmak, Menderes, Sakarya, and Yeşilırmak.

Turkey’s weather varies according to region but is generally hot and dry in the summer and cold in the winters.

Turkey National Events, Dates for Muslim Festivals

Turkey

The dates for Muslim religious festivals are celebrated according to a lunar calendar; the dates are locked in every few years by Muslim authorities. Only two religious holidays are public holidays: Seker Bayrami, a 3-day festival at the end of Ramazan (30 days in December-January when a good Muslim lets nothing pass the lips during daylight hours), and Kurban Bayrami (March-April) which commemorates Abraham’s near-sacrifice of Ismael on Mt Moriah.

In commemoration of God permitting Abraham to sacrifice a ram instead of his son, every Turkish household who can afford a sheep buys one, takes it home and slits its throat right after the early morning prayers on the actual day of the bayram. Family and friends immediately cook up a feast. You must plan for Kurban Bayrami: most banks close for a full week, transportation will be packed and hotel rooms will be scarce and expensive.

Secular festivities include camel-wrestling in mid-January, in the village of Selçuk, south of Izmir, and National Sovereignty Day, April 23, a big holiday to celebrate the first meeting of the republican parliament in 1920. Celebrations abound in summer: there’s a sloppy oiled wrestling festival in early June at Sarayiçi, near Edirne; the country Kafkasör Festival near Artvin in northeastern Turkey in the 3rd week of June; the International Istanbul Festival of the Arts (late June to mid-July); Bursa’s Folklore and Music Festival in mid-July and Diyarbakir’s Watermelon Festival in mid or late September. The whole country stops, just for a moment, at 9:05am November 10, the time of Atatürk’s death in 1938.

Aden Hotel, Istanbul

Aden Hotel, Istanbul

Rihtim Cad. Yugurcusukru Sok. 2 Kadikoy, Istanbul

80 Rooms, 160 Beds

All Rooms with Private Bathroom, Direct Dial Telephone, Music, Minibar, Air-Condition, TV Satellite System

Le Bistro Restaurant & Marmara restaurant with Panoramic view cap. 400

Conference room cap. 50

Banquet facilities cap. 200

Parking

2 Bars

Laundry

Coiffeur

TV Room

Travel Agency

Ticketing Service

In City Center, Airport 30 km

Topkapi Eresin Hotel, Istanbul

Topkapi Eresin Hotel, Istanbul

Millet Cad. Topkapi, Istanbul

251 Rooms, 510 Beds, 7 Suites, 3 Special Suites

All Rooms With Private Bathroom, Hair Dryer, Direct Dial telephone, Music, Air-Condition, Minibar, Refrigerator, TV Satellite System, Central Heating

Restaurant, Snack Bar, Conference Room cap. 600 with simultanous translation, 5 Meeting Rooms cap. 350, Banquet Facilities cap. 1500, Swimming Pool with children section, 3 Bars (Restaurant, Lobby, Pool), Night Club, Jacuzzi, English Pub cap. 200, Garden, Turkish Bath, Sauna, Fitness Center, Coiffeur, Health Cabin, Fin Bath, Shopping Center, Garagge

In city center, Airport 10 km

Merit Antique Hotel Istanbul

Merit Antique Hotel Istanbul

(Ex Ramada Hotel Istanbsul) Ordu Cad. 226 34470 Laleli, Istanbul

275 Rooms, 551 Beds, 1 Presidental Suite, 16 Studios,  6 Executive Studios

All Rooms with Private Bathroom, Direct Dial telephone, Music, Air-Condition, Minibar, TV Satellite System, Hair Drier

Lale Restaurant cap. 80. Ocakbaşı Restaurant cap. 110. Dynasty Oriental Restaurant cap 11O.

Conference and Meeting Rooms with Simultaneous Translation total cap. 150. Banquet Facilities cap. 500. Indoor Swimming Pool. Bar . Casino. Beauty Hall .
Coiffeur. La Patisserie. Babiali Wine Bar. Health Club. Sauna. Jacuzzi. Solarium& Massage: Secreterial Services

The only international Hotel in the old city, Airport 17 km.

The Marmara Hotel, Taksim Istanbul

The Marmara Hotel, Taksim Istanbul

Taksim Square 80090 Taksim, Istanbul

432 Luxurious rooms (12 Corner Suites, 16 Business Suites, 3 Executive Suites and 2 Presidential Suites)

All Rooms with Private Bathroom, Direct Dial Telephone, radio channels,TV, satellile channels, air-condition, minibar, hair dryer, 24 hours room service

Panorama Restaurant, Brasserie and Cafe Marmara with local and International Cuisine, Patisserie, Merhaba Bar, Tepe Bar, Grand Ballroom (A+B), Taksim Ballroom (A+B), Anadolu Room, Rumeli Room, Toros Room, Orient Express, Opera Room (Verdi-Mozart-Wagner), Tepe Room, MEC-The Marmara Exhibition Center, Swimming Pool, Doctor, Hairdresser, Gift Shops, Laundry/Dry Cleanning, Turkish Bath, Sauna, Fitness Center, Parking

In the City Center with the views of Bosphorus, Marmara Sea and Golden Horn